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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels found in the catalog.

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels

G. H. Cook

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels

by G. H. Cook

  • 132 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Phoenix House in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chantries -- England

  • Edition Notes

    StatementG. H. Cook.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 196p. :
    Number of Pages196
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19103247M

    The study of chantries and chantry chapels has much to offer the student of medieval history and religion, and overall this volume has much to contribute here. Eleven essays are presented in this volume and lead the reader through a wide spectrum of monuments, foundations, and patterns of patronage.   The chantry was a phenomenon of the later middle ages whose origins have never been satisfactorily explained. It is argued here that what led to its emergence in the thirteenth century was the inability of the monastic orders, at a time of rising population and increasing awareness of the pains of Purgatory, to cope with the growing demand for .

      Studies in the history of medieval religion; v BX A chantry is a foundation or endowment of a mass by one or more benefactors, explains Roffey (archaeology, U. of Winchester), and while most were of a prescribed duration and celebrated at existing altars, some were perpetual and chapels were built expressively for them, typically within. William Wyggeston's chantry house, built around , in Leicester: the building housed two priests, who served at a chantry chapel in the nearby St Mary de Castro church. It was sold as a private dwelling after the dissolution of the chantries. Following the Reformation in England initiated by King Henry VIII, Parliament passed an Act in which defined chantries as .

      In the thirteenth-century Exeter’s Cross Altar stood either before on atop the rood screen, and attracted the chantry of Sir John Montacute (Nicholas Orme, “The Medieval Chantries of Exeter Cathedral, P” Devon & Cornwall Notes & Queries 35 (),   It is almost impossible to pick up a book about chantries at St Paul’s cathedral in the pre-Reformation centuries without recalling these lines on the Parson in the Prologue to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. They are unavoidably referenced by Marie-Hélène Rousseau in her survey of the cathedral’s perpetual chantries (pp. ,


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Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels by G. H. Cook Download PDF EPUB FB2

Analysis of later medieval wills has shown that the chantry appeared in many forms. A perpetual chantry consisted of one or more priests, in a private free-standing chapel, usually licensed by the local bishop (such as the surviving one at Noseley, Leicestershire) or in an aisle of a greater chantries were in religious communities, they were sometimes headed by a warden.

The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval religious foundations.

These structures, although much altered with time, are still a very noticeable Reviews: 1. Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels [George Henry Cook] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This book is a work long overdue and Marie- Hélène’s superb research has revealed the complexity and variety of chantry functions in an important church in a clear and well-written account. Notes. Wood-Legh, Perpetual Chantries in Britain (Cambridge, ).Back to (1) Wood-Legh, Perpetual Chantries, p.

Back to (2). The eleven essays presented here lead the reader through the earliest manifestations of the chantry, the origins and development of ‘stone-cage’ chapels, royal patronage of commemorative art and architecture, the chantry in the late medieval parish, the provision of music and textiles, and a series of specific chantries created for William.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cook, George Henry. Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. London, Phoenix House [] (OCoLC) The eleven essays presented here lead the reader through the earliest manifestations of the chantry, the origins and development of ‘stone-cage’ chapels, royal patronage of commemorative art and architecture, the chantry in the late medieval parish, the provision of music and textiles, and a series of specific chantries created for William.

Buy Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels Revised Edition by Cook, George Henry (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : George Henry Cook.

But there were chantries without chapels and chapels (for instance, dedicated to the Virgin) without chantries. The stone caged chantry situated between the piers of arcades, most often thought of as a chantry chapel, was almost exclusively found in cathedrals: they were too expensive and, perhaps, too large and intrusive for parish churches.

The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval.

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels / G.H. Cook by G. (George Henry) Cook and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at OCLC Number: Notes: First impression June Second impression April Description: xii, pages: illustrations, 59 plates, plans ; 23 cm.

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Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. [G H Cook] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library.

Create Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n library. The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An archaeology Simon Roffey. The Boydell Press £40 () Church Times Bookshop £36 “IN MY Father’s house are many mansions.” The same could be said of medieval churches, which were buildings of several rooms, not single spaces as they tend to be used today.

Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels Hardcover – January 1, by G. Cook (Author) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Author: G.

Cook. The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology (Studies in the History of Medieval Religion) Simon Roffey. Hardcover. £ Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels George Henry Cook. Hardcover. 10 offers from £ Traditions of Death and Burial (Shire Library) Helen Frisby. out of 5 stars 6.

Paperback. £ Reviews: 4. Before the Reformation, bridge chapels were chantry chapels, so called because each chapel was served by its own priest or priests whose duty was to chant masses or dirges for the souls of the dead. According to George Henry Cook, in Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels, ‘masses were sung for the well-being of travellers and for the souls.

In Mediaeval times, Chantry Chapels could be found throughout Lichfield Cathedral, in which chantry priests would say mass for the souls of the departed. Following the abolition of Chantries, most of the Chapels we're removed, however, you can still find this medieval Chantry Chapel in the Lady Chapel, which now houses a monument to Bishop.

St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle; The Queen's Free Chapel of the College of St George, Windsor Castle: 51°29′02″N 0°36′24″W  /  °N °W  / ; Coordinates: 51°29′02″N 0°36′24″W  /  °N °W  / Location: Windsor: Country: England.

That it was quite distinct from the free Lady Chapel within the churchyard is shown by the inventories of andand by the will of Richard Colyn desiring that a chaplain should celebrate before the image of the Virgin in the church.

Only two perpetual chantry chapels existed in the church when Edward VI suppressed all chantries in Page 24 of note 2 This estimate includes several chantries about which little or nothing is known except for the appearance of a licence for alienation in mortmain on the royal patent rolls.

The York evidence therefore leads to a conclusion somewhere between the extreme view of Professor Jordan (Philanthropy in England,[London, ], 51) that ‘it was quite uncommon for a chantry.York cathedral shows virtually no signs of the existence of chantry chapels or shrines, although there is documentary evidence for as many as sixty altars, dedicated to a bewildering variety of saints and often serving as multiple chantries.